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Tumours in dogs

Tumours are a common reason for veterinary visits. Tumours, which means lumps, can be either benign or malignant and they can occur in any organ of the body. Find out about types of tumours you can discover on your dog.

Early treatment of tumours increases the chances of recovery. 

 

Common tumours in dogs

Bitches can, for example, suffer from mammary gland tumours and males can suffer from tumours in the testicles. Skin tumours are also common.

  • Skin tumour
  • Uterine tumour
  • Testicular tumour
  • Tumour in the oral cavity

Skin tumours can vary in appearance

Skin tumours can be hairless or sore, but they can also look like harmless warts. Some grow slowly, some quickly and some spread throughout the body (metastasize). But just based on appearance or growth, one cannot tell whether they are benign or malignant

Every year, thousands of bitches are affected by mammary tumours

The risk of suffering from mammary gland tumours increases with the age of the bitch and is most common in middle-aged and older bitches. The most common symptoms are the same as in women, one or more lumps appear in the breast tissue. 70% have more than one nodule once the disease is detected.

How to detect a mammary tumour

Early treatment increases the chances of recovery

For most tumours, it is important to treat as soon as possible. On the one hand, it is easier to operate on smaller tumours, and on the other hand, the risk that the tumours may have had time to spread tumour cells into the body is reduced. It is important to find tumours early and establish the diagnosis. It reduces the risk of malignant tumours having time to spread in the body. Don't wait until a change has started to grow because then it may be too late.

If the vet suspects that a change is malignant, a cell or tissue sample is taken before the operation. Diagnostic imaging such as X-ray, ultrasound or CT may need to be performed to see if spread has occurred to other organs. With more facts about the type of tumour in question, it can be better determined how much of the area around the change should be surgically removed and whether the treatment needs to be supplemented with, for example, chemotherapy.

Examine your dog regularly

Check the dog regularly by looking and feeling for tumours, this way you notice any changes as early as possible.

  • Have the male dog's testicles changed slightly in size or texture?
  • Are there any changes in the bitch's udder lines?
  • Do you feel a lump in your dog's skin?
  • Do you suddenly feel a lump somewhere on your body that you haven't felt before?
  • Does it look normal in the mouth?

Learn how to examine your dog

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