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15 Common plants that are poisonous to pets

Did you know there are several poisonous hazards for our furry friends? Our pets are curious creatures and will often sniff, chew and ingest plants which could be extremely dangerous to them. Sometimes it’s just the flowers or pollen which are poisonous or sometimes it can be the bulbs or leaves.

1. Lilies

Lilies are extremely toxic to cats. All parts of the plant are poisonous and can lead to serious kidney problems. Even the water from a vase of lilies can contain toxins; something to be mindful of for those cats that like alternative water sources to drink from. 

2. Spring bulbs

Including Daffodils, Tulips, Iris, Hyacinth, Bluebells and Crocus. These are very toxic to dogs so it is important to keep them out of reach before planting and ensure that they are not dug up once planted.  The flowers can also be harmful. Symptoms can include gastrointestinal upsets, fits, lethargy or breathing difficulties. 

3. Ivy

Ivy can cause gastrointestinal upsets if ingested, as well as skin irritation and rashes if the sap comes into contact with your pet’s skin.

4. Giant Hogweed

Giant hogweed is particularly dangerous and can be present all year round. It contains a toxin in the sap which is released when the stem is broken. This can cause nasty skin blisters, usually seen around the face or anywhere the fur is less thick. It can also cause problems if it gets into your pets eyes or is ingested.

Other common plants to avoid are...

Azalea, Geranium, Holly, Horse Chestnut, Hydrangea, Laurel, Garlic plants, Grapevines, Ragwort, Rhubarb, Yew and many others.

Many types of fungi and mushrooms out in the wild can also be extremely dangerous if ingested and in some cases can lead to organ failure.

Certain types of compost may contain fertiliser or bacteria and large piles of leaves and compost heaps can contain harmful moulds so make sure these are kept out of harms way.

There are also several plants that are toxic to our pet rabbits. The bulbed plants mentioned previously are also to be avoided, as well as Buttercups, Foxgloves, Primroses, Poppy, Holly and Yew. Please keep you outdoor bunnies away from these plants.

If you are ever concerned your pet has ingested or been in contact with something that could be toxic, even if you are unsure, please always seek Veterinary advice immediately. Time is often critical in these scenarios.

As an Agria Pet Insurance customer, you can speak to a vet completely free whenever you have a question or concern about your pet’s health. Simply download the Agria Vet Guide app for free 24/7 video calls; giving you expert advice to help keep your pet happy and healthy. 

Find out more about the Agria Vet Guide app.

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